Just What is the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015?

Are you in the throws of political overload? With over eighteen presidential debates behind us and a thousand more on the horizon, you may be sick to death over anything that involves the government. However, you might want to take notice of the recent changes to the law that have been included in the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015.

At one time it was not only legal to grow and sell hemp, farmers who grew industrial hemp were lauded as heroes of World War II: From Vote Hemp

During World War II, domestic hemp production became crucial when the Japanese cut off Asian supplies to the U.S. American farmers who grew hemp were even exempt from military duty. A 1942 U.S. Department of Agriculture film called “Hemp For Victory” extolled the agricultural might of hemp and called for hundreds of thousands of acres to be planted for the war effort.

However, sometime after, confusion as to the distinction between hemp and marijuana prompted those fearful of potential hallucinogen properties to spearhead a campaign to make it illegal to grow hemp. We’ve become smarter over time, as is the case, and now a growing movement is taking over the country in favor of industrial hemp.

Thus the creation of the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015, which says:

Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of “marihuana.” Defines “industrial hemp” to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law, unless the Attorney General determines that the state law is not reasonably calculated to comply with such definition.

The Hemp Revolution is gaining momentum with a number of prominent government leaders supporting the legalization of industrial hemp. From a US News and World report we learn:

According to the advocacy group Vote Hemp, 21 states have laws allowing for industrial hemp production, but only three states – Colorado, Kentucky and Vermont – rolled out pilot programs in 2014.

 “Allowing farmers throughout our nation to cultivate industrial hemp and benefit from its many uses will boost our economy and bring much-needed jobs to the agriculture industry,” Sen. Paul said in a statement circulated by Vote Hemp.

“The federal ban on hemp has been a waste of taxpayer dollars that ignores science, suppresses innovation, and subverts the will of states that have chosen to incorporate this versatile crop into their economies,” said Rep. Jared Polis, D-Colo., who’s co-sponsoring the House bill.

Interested in the latest information for your state? Vote Hemp has a page on their website that links to all fifty states with current information. Is there a way to weave the keyword in here again?

As a registered voter in the United States, you have the opportunity to make a difference in the movement to legalize industrial hemp.

Visit Moveon.org to sign a petition to Legalize Hemp Farming in the United States. Your signature and any additional comments will be delivered to The United States House of Representatives, The United States Senate, and President Barack Obama.

The process is in motion with the creation of the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015. Together we can overturn the national band on industrial hemp farming and open the flood gates to the economic and environmental benefits of industrial hemp.

Stay connected with us to keep on top of the latest information. And if you are considering investing in a company that supports green industries, check out Stock Trading Symbol OTC: HEMP.

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